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Floaters that turn ocean waves into renewable energy could power our homes

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Blue metal floaters attached to an old World War II ammo jetty in Gibraltar’s coastline oscillate up and down, converting the moderate rise and fall of waves into renewable electricity. 

The floaters were developed by Eco Wave Power, a business that aims to turn man-made structures like breakwaters and piers into renewable energy sources.

According to the development team, each batch of these floaters is specifically created to accommodate the particular wave conditions where they are deployed. 

For instance, smaller waves require smaller floaters since they are easier to move up and down, whereas larger waves can accommodate larger floaters and hence require fewer of them.

Land-based accumulators that are built into large blue shipping containers are inflated by the movement of the floaters. 

A hydraulic motor is turned by the fluid pressure caused by the rising waves. That then starts a generator, which turns on an inverter to transfer electricity to the power grid.

The hydraulic pressure generated by the floaters is converted into electrical energy for the grid inside one of Eco Wave Power’s land-based containers.

When waves become too high during a storm, the unit automatically locks into an upright position to protect itself, and once the bad weather has gone, it descends back into the sea.

According to Eco Wave Power, its complete system — from floater to grid— is about 50% efficient, which means that roughly 50% of the wave energy that enters the system is successfully transformed into electricity. To put that number into perspective, consider that it is higher than the typical solar panel efficiency of 15% to 20%, the typical wind turbine efficiency of 20% to 40%, and the typical coal power plant efficiency of 33%, according to a CNET report.

There are now a few areas where the company consistently provides grid power, and more are on the way. The company’s first grid-connected station was inaugurated in Gibraltar in 2016 and a second one is presently being built at Jaffa Port in Tel Aviv, Israel. In early 2023, a third is anticipated to open in Los Angeles.

The quantity of energy generated by each floater depends on the local wave conditions. Each of the company’s floaters in Jaffa, according to Inna Braverman, co-founder and CEO of Eco Wave Power, may produce up to 10 kWh, or roughly enough energy for 10 households.

According to Braverman, the business has carried out numerous environmental studies, which have revealed no adverse effects on the environment. Additionally, the fluid used to generate the hydraulic pressure within the system is biodegradable.

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VPNs, X, and Slow Internet Services Are Still Blocked in Pakistan

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Users are reporting poor performance on numerous social media sites due to widespread slowdowns in internet access. Furthermore, X (previously Twitter) has been inaccessible for the past six days, despite the Sindh High Court’s directive to allow access. In the meantime, Pakistan is blocking VPN services.

X Remains Unblockable

On February 17, 2024, the Pakistani government first prohibited access to X when it was discovered that Rawalpindi’s Commissioner had rigged election results. The block is still in effect, even though there has been no official announcement or explanation for it. Despite the Supreme Court’s decision to lift the prohibition, the administration has not yet disclosed any plans for reinstatement. Furthermore, officials are giving media outlets conflicting information about the limitations.

Blocked VPN Services

Virtual private network (VPN) services are being widely blocked nationwide, which exacerbates the problem. Apart from limiting accessibility to X, the government has initiated the banning of prominent VPN providers, impeding users’ capacity to establish connections with any server.

sluggish internet access

There is a noticeable slowdown in internet speeds and a decline in performance across Pakistan. The problem hasn’t been acknowledged by the Pakistan Telecommunications Authority (PTA), nevertheless. Even though internet service providers (ISPs) insist there aren’t any outages, consumers on social media sites are nonetheless complaining about poor access.

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Another X, previously Twitter, outage has affected Pakistan.

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Adding to the current difficulties with online connectivity, internet users in Pakistan experienced yet another disturbance when attempting to use the services of social media site X, formerly known as Twitter.

Users from Islamabad and other regions of the nation were unable to use the site for several hours since the service was down.

The Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA), which is becoming increasingly concerned about the frequent outages, has not made an official remark about the matter.

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Pakistan

Elections 2024: On February 8, a “suspension” of cellphone and internet services was suggested.

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The suggestion was made at the meeting of the ECP, which was convened to examine the state of law and order in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan.

According to those with knowledge of the situation, there was a suggestion to cut back on mobile and internet service in vulnerable sections of the nation in time for the general elections in 2024.

The election candidates’ security was also a topic of discussion during the conference, and CEC Sikandar Sultan Raja voiced his worries about the rise in attacks on political gatherings in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan.

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